PAN1762 USB Evaluation Kit I2C Interface with IMU Sensor

Hi, I have successfully run demo project of PAN1762 USB Evaluation Kit using IAR Embedded Workbench IDE. I have to interface USB stick in standalone mode with an IMU sensor via I2C protocol. From the Toshiba SDK developer manual, I can see that it probably involves implementing some API calls and application callbacks in application code. However, there is little guidance available on how to make it happen. For example, where should I implement these callbacks (and which callbacks precisely) in the demo code? I couldn't find any schematic of PAN1762 USB Stick that shows which GPIO pins ought to be used for I2C interace. If anyone can give me stepwise guidelines to develop this application, it would be really helpful. Thanks.

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  • However, there is little guidance available on how to make it happen.

    In addition to the PAN1762 Software Guide and the Toshiba Bluetooth SDK, please also check out the board support package from Toshiba called "Software Manual & Sample Code", which can be found on the following page:

    https://toshiba.semicon-storage.com/ap-en/product/wireless-communication/bluetooth/detail.TC35680FSG-002.html

    The TC35680_681_ROM002_ProgrammingGuide_EN_20190131.pdf provides the descriptions you are probably looking for.

    The package also includes low-level sample applications showing the usage of the different peripherals.

    If anyone can give me stepwise guidelines to develop this application, it would be really helpful.

    Please be aware that these demos use the Keil MDK IDE instead of IAR Embedded Workbench.

    Before you run any of the demos, please check out the WM PAN1762 Application Note Current Consumption in Low Power Modes from the PAN1762 product page at https://pideu.panasonic.de/products/bluetooth/pan1762-bluetooth-50-low-energy-module.html

    It shows the usage of the low power modes by using the sample applications from the BSP.

    It also contains a chapter called "Bluetooth Device Address Safeguard" that you need to follow, because the sample applications from the BSP - when written to the non-volatile memory - will erase the programmed Bluetooth device address and there is no way of getting them back if it is lost.

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